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Policy On Academic Integrity

“The Task of the teacher is to help each student become an independent learner, to assume the responsibility of his or her own education” (Go Forth and Teach: The Characteristics of Jesuit Education). 

Fairfield Prep encourages each student to be actively engaged in the learning process. It is the Prep’s expectation that students, over time, will be increasingly able to learn on their own and produce scholarship of which they can be proud. This development requires special care in maintaining an attitude of academic honesty throughout a student’s four years at the Prep.

Students who submit materials that are the products of their own mind demonstrate respect for themselves and their community in which they study.  These students possess a strong sense of honor, reverence for truth and a commitment to the ideals of Jesuit Education. Dishonesty harms not only a particular student’s integrity but also the wider community, which suffers from decreased trust and a lack of respect for the honesty and integrity of others.  Since integrity must be preserved, dishonesty is intolerable. Consequently, misrepresentation of academic achievement in any form will be considered a significant violation of our community’s standards. 

Violations of this standard include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials in any academic exercise or having someone else do work for you.  Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to, looking at another student’s paper during a quiz or test; obtaining or giving a copy of a quiz or test, or submitting homework borrowed from another student.
     
  • Electronic Dishonesty: Using network access inappropriately in a way that affects a class or other students’ academic work.  Examples include, but are not limited to, using someone else’s computer account, breaking into someone else’s files, or using material from someone else’s storage device.
     
  • Electronic Device Misuse: Using electronic devices, including, but not limited to, smart-watches, phones, iPads, inappropriately. Examples include, but are not limited to, using AirDrop to send files for submission, submitting a file sent from another student as one’s own, taking pictures of in-class assessments.
     
  • Theft and Unauthorized Distribution of Academic Materials: Examples include, but are not limited to, tests, quizzes, teacher text editions, storage devices, cell phone images of tests, quizzes, etc.
     
  • Fabrication:  Inventing or falsifying information.  Examples include, but are not limited to, inventing lab data for an experiment you did not do or did not do correctly or making references to sources you did not use in a research paper.
     
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty:  Helping someone else to commit an act of academic dishonesty.  This would include giving someone a paper or homework to copy from or allowing someone to cheat from your test paper.
     
  • Plagiarism:  Using words or ideas of another writer without attribution, so that they seem as if they are your own.  Plagiarism ranges from copying someone else’s work word for word, to rewriting someone else’s work with only minor word changes, to summarizing without acknowledging a source.
     
  • Abuse of Academic Materials:  Harming, appropriating, or disabling academic resources so that others cannot use them.  This includes cutting tables and illustrations out of books to use in a paper, stealing books or articles, and deleting or damaging computer files intended for others’ use.
     
  • Deception and Misrepresentations:  Lying about or misrepresenting your work or academic records.  Examples include, but are not limited to, forging a teacher’s or a parent’s signature on documents, taking credit for group work to which you did not contribute significantly or for which you did not meet your obligations, or using a translation program in a foreign language class without the permission of the teacher. This also includes students submitting assignments in one class that were previously submitted in another class or for a prior assignment.
     
  • Unauthorized Use of Calculators/Computers: Using calculator programs, or computer programs and/or data in a manner not approved by the teacher.
     
  • Daily Homework Assignments:  Determining penalties for cheating on daily homework assignments is at the sole discretion of the teacher.

Fairfield Prep acknowledges that all people on occasion make errors in judgment; indeed, as St. Ignatius Loyola teaches us, we are all sinners who are loved by God.  Thus, when we fail, there is always the possibility of forgiveness and reconciliation.  When academic dishonesty occurs, it is Prep’s belief that there must be sanctions for the offending student, for the good of that individual as well as of our academic community.  It is our hope that recognition of one’s mistakes will lead to wisdom, and to a resolve to always act with honesty and integrity.  Any student who turns himself in because of a violation of our academic integrity policy will be treated both appropriately and leniently.

Procedure for Observed Cheating

  • In all instances, the teacher (or prefect on semester exams) determines that cheating has occurred. The teacher’s determination that a student has violated the academic integrity policy is FINAL and is not open to negotiation, debate, or subjective interpretation of the circumstances surrounding said violation.
     
  • The teacher completes the Referral Form for Violations of the Academic Integrity & Technology AUP Policies form and follows the procedure listed on the form.

Procedure for Theft and Unauthorized Distribution of Academic Materials

  1. The teacher fills out the Referral Form for Violations of the Academic Integrity & Technology AUP Policies form and immediately reports the incident to the Academic Dean. The Academic Dean will convene an Ad hoc Investigative Team comprised of the following: the teacher, the Department Chairperson of the discipline, the Dean of Guidance and College Advising, and the Director of Student Discipline, all of whom will work collaboratively to identify the involved offender(s), the extent of the violations, gradations of culpability, etc. (Director of Student Discipline), review records to determine if the offender(s) are repeaters and to review each of the offender’s overall academic performance (Academic Dean), assess each of the offender’s extenuating personal, social, emotional or psychological circumstances (Dean of Guidance & College Advising), and review each of the offender’s academic performance in the teacher’s class and the communication history: Teacher-student, teacher-parent, and/or Chair-parent  (Teacher & Department Chair)
     
  2. After the initial investigative meeting, a date and time will be set for a second meeting of the Ad hoc Investigative Team. At that time, the team will collaboratively decide if the violation warrants convening the Academic Integrity Board to determine if additional academic and/or disciplinary sanctions that exceed the penalties described below should apply.
     
  3. The Academic Dean will record the academic and disciplinary penalties and keep them on file.


 

Penalties for Violating the Policy on Academic Integrity

Students should realize that some violations of the Academic Integrity Policy are so serious as to warrant the most severe consequences regardless of whether the transgression is a first, second or third offense.

First Offense: 

Faculty complete the Referral Form for Violations of the Academic Integrity & Technology AUP Policies form and follow the procedure listed on the form. The student receives a “0” for the assignment. Other discipline is at the sole discretion of the classroom teacher.

Second Offense:

Faculty complete the Referral Form for Violations of the Academic Integrity & Technology AUP Policies form and follow the procedure listed on the form. The student receives a “0” for the assignment. The student will meet with his parent / guardian and Guidance Counselor to discuss the two offenses. A letter will be sent to the student and his parent / guardian explaining that an additional violation of the Academic Integrity Policy will force the Academic Integrity Board to convene. The student will serve three days of JUG with the Director of Student Discipline.

Third Offense:

Faculty complete the Referral Form for Violations of the Academic Integrity & Technology AUP Policies form and follow the procedure listed on the form. The student receives a “0” for the assignment. The student will serve three days of in school suspension with the Director of Student Discipline. After the third offense has been committed, the Academic Integrity Board will meet with the student and his parent / guardian(s) to consider additional penalties.